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Job the Silent A Study in Historical Counterpoint by Bruce Zuckerman

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Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Number of Pages304
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7388486M
ISBN 100195121279
ISBN 109780195121278
OCLC/WorldCa40597083

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"Job the Silent is enjoyable reading. It is also a major work of Joban scholarship. Zuckerman's thesis deserves a thoroughgoing evaluation and critique."—The Catholic Biblical Quarterly "This is one of the most fascinating and perceptive studies of the Book of Job that I have read."—Journal of Theological Studies "[An] excellent book."—Price: $ Job the Silent A Study in Historical Counterpoint Bruce Zuckerman. In this strikingly original study, Zuckerman compares The Book of Job and its fate to that of the famous Yiddish short story, "Bontsye Shvayg," a covert parody whose protagonist has come to be revered as a . "Job the Silent is enjoyable reading. It is also a major work of Joban scholarship. Zuckerman's thesis deserves a thoroughgoing evaluation and critique."--The Catholic Biblical Quarterly "This is one of the most fascinating and perceptive studies of the Book of Job that I have read."--Journal of Theological Studies "[An] excellent book."--Pages: In fact, the Book of Job, if properly understood, can teach us many deep and meaningful truths. What we have to guard against is the drawing of improper conclusions that contradict the perfect character and ways of God or other truths that are clearly taught in the Scriptures.

Verse - Hold your peace, let me alone, that I may speak; literally, be silent from me that I may speak; but our version gives the true repeats the entreaty with which he had bemoan (vers. 5, 6).And let some on me what is prepared to face the worst. He feels, as he expresses it below (ver. 19), that, if he holds his tongue, he must die.   In this Bible story from the book of Job, there is a wealthy man named Job residing in an area called Uz with his extended family and vast flocks. He is “blameless” and “upright,” constantly mindful to live in a righteous manner ().God brags to Satan about Job’s virtue, but Satan contends that Job is only righteous because God has favored him generously. No one said a word to Job, for they saw that his suffering was too great for words. English Standard Version And they sat with him on the ground seven days and seven nights, and no one spoke a word to him, for they saw that his suffering was very great. In order to answer why God can be silent [hidden] in our sufferings, we have looked at the narrative context of the Book of Job and at corresponding New Testament texts. Let us now turn to the poetic, wisdom genre which forms the central portion of Job.

Job, by staying silent before God, stresses the point that he understands that his affliction is God's will even though he despairs at not knowing why. Job appears faithful without direct knowledge of God and without demands for special attention from God, even for a cause that all others would declare to be just. The Book of Job tells how one man suddenly awakened to the anarchy rampant in the world, yet his attachment to God outlived the ruin of his tidy system. Job is a pious believer who is struck by misfortune so great that it cannot be explained in the usual way as a prompting to repentance, a warning, let alone a punishment (the arguments later addressed to him by his friends). After being silent throughout the dialogues between Job and his friends, God finally speaks to Job out of the whirlwind. God does not answer their questions about Job's guilt or innocence, but rather speaks about the created order and contrasts what God can do with what humans are able to do. Analysis All through the book, Job had been hoping. Job 1 King James Version (KJV) 1 There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared God, and eschewed evil. 2 And there were born unto him seven sons and three daughters.